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Mission Valley Pet Sitting Services

We treat your pets like MVP'S               760-644-0289

MVP Blog

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Pet Insurance

Posted on February 27, 2018 at 10:41 AM Comments comments (0)
For those of you pet parents that are interested in purchasing Pet Insurance but don't have a clue where to start to start, pick up the March 2018 issue of "Whole Dog Journal".It has a whole section in it that describes what you should look for and the comparison between current plans that are available. It is expertly prepared and chock full of wonderful information.

Tent City for the Homeless

Posted on November 13, 2017 at 9:28 AM Comments comments (0)
 At the beginning of October, San Diego opened a temporary residence (tent city) in Golden Hills for the homeless. They currently have 200 residents including 45 children and about 40 dogs. A plan exists to open a permanent camp site residence downtown on Dec. 1, 2017. There are plans for 2 more campsites after that, housing some 1000 homeless in the county. These campsites are sponsored and monitored by the Alpha Project.
Mission Valley Pet Sitting Services is commencing a campaign immediately to collect donations of dog food, and clothes and toys for the children. We will collect through Dec. 24 and deliver the donations to Alpha Square for distribution to the homeless residents. 
We ask that you open your hearts to these people especially the children and animals. We do not want $ donations; just dog food, blankets, clothes for children and toys and games for the kids for Christmas. If you can help please contact me at [email protected] and I will make arrangements to pick up your donation.
Thanking you in advance.

Information on the new 2017 Vaccine Protoclol

Posted on November 6, 2017 at 3:54 PM Comments comments (0)
Dr. Nancy Kay  wrote a wonderful Blog on the updated version of the Vaccine protocols for our dogs. I have printed it here with her permission. 

   SPEAKING FOR SPOT WEBSITE  |   BLOG   |   BUY BOOKS NOW   |   EMAIL DR. KAY    

Updated Canine Vaccination Guidelines by Nancy Kay, DVM.

"The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) has released their 2017 Canine Vaccination Guidelines, the first update of this document since the 2011 version. A task force of veterinary experts who prepared the guidelines based their recommendations on vaccine research, immunological principles and clinical experience.The two core vaccinations (those that every dog should receive barring special circumstances) discussed within the guidelines are:·       
 Rabies·        
DAPP: a combination of Canine Distemper Virus, Adenovirus-2, and Parvovirus +/- Parainfluenza Virus

The roster of noncore vaccinations (those that may be warranted depending on the dog’s lifestyle) now includes:·        
Bordetella bronchiseptica only (kennel cough)·       
 Leptospirosis·        
Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease)·        
Canine Influenza Virus– H3N8·       
 Canine Influenza Virus– H3N2·        
Crotalus atrox (rattlesnake vaccine)

Antibody testing versus revaccinating

The 2017 Vaccination Guidelines provides in-depth information about antibody testing (also referred to as titer testing, vaccine titers, and vaccine serology). Antibody testing involves analyzing a small blood sample to determine the level of protective immunity against a particular disease, for example parvovirus or distemper. We know that a distemper/parvovirus vaccination protects for a minimum of three years, but beyond this time period the duration of immunity varies from dog to dog. For some, protection lasts a lifetime.Distemper, canine adenovirus-2, and parvovirus antibody testing have become readily available. Many veterinarians use a tableside test that provides results within minutes. A negative test result supports revaccinating. Conversely, a positive test result indicates that revaccination is likely not warranted at that time. Antibody testing for rabies is also available but is rarely warranted given that state law dictates the frequency of revaccination.Antibody testing is becoming more popular amongst people who prefer to rely on test results rather than automatically give a distemper, parvovirus, and adenovirus booster every three years. Vaccine serology is also useful for determining if a puppy who has just completed the vaccination series has mounted an adequate immune system response. Additionally, antibody testing can be helpful in situations in which revaccinating might not be a wise choice such as:·       
 A dog with a chronic illness·        
A dog who is very elderly·        
A dog who has experienced a prior adverse reaction to a vaccination·        
A dog with a history of immune-mediated (autoimmune disease)·        A dog who is receiving drugs that could suppress the immune system’s response to a vaccination.

Something new

The 2017 version of the Vaccination Guidelines contains a brand new section devoted to “therapeutic biologics.” While these products are often referred to as vaccines (for example, the melanoma vaccine), they behave quite differently compared to traditional vaccines. Rather than protect against disease, therapeutic biologics are designed to elicit an immune system response that alters the course of a disease such as cancer, or modifies an animal’s response to an immune mediated (autoimmune disease). The Vaccination Guidelines includes discussion of therapeutic biologics as treatments for:·        
Canine oral melanoma·        
Canine B-cell lymphoma·        
Canine T-cell lymphoma·        
Canine atopic dermatitis (atopy)·        
Canine cancers·        
Tumor-derived immunotherapy for canine cancer·        
Mammary cancers in dogs.

How often should vaccinations be given?

The recommended timing and frequency of vaccinations hasn’t changed to any significant degree, particularly for the core vaccinations. Rabies and DAPP vaccinations need not be administered to adult dogs more than once every three years. Recommended schedules for the noncore vaccinations vary based on type of vaccine and route of inoculation.Keep in mind that, just as is true for any other medical procedure, vaccinations carry inherent benefits as well as the potential for adverse side effects. Giving unnecessary vaccinations exposes the dog to all the inherent risks without any possibility of benefit. There’s simply no way this makes any sense whatsoever.Keep in mind, the AAHA Canine Vaccination Guidelines are guidelines only. The recommendations within this document are not mandatory or enforceable in any way. So, if your veterinarian is one of the holdouts who insists on administering unnecessary vaccinations (those that are unnecessary based on your dog’s lifestyle or those given more frequently than recommended), I encourage you to step up to the plate as your dog’s medical advocate and find a new veterinarian.How have your views on vaccinations for your dog changed over the past decade?

If you would like to respond publicly, please visit: http://www.speakingforspot.com/blog/?p=5559.Best wishes,Nancy Kay, DVMDiplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Author of Your Dog's Best Health: A Dozen Reasonable Things to Expect From Your Vet
Recipient, Leo K. Bustad Companion Animal Veterinarian of the Year Award
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on FacebookPlease visit http://www.speakingforspot.com to read excerpts from Speaking for Spot and Your Dog's Best Health.   There you will also find "Advocacy Aids"- helpful health forms you can download and use for your own dog, and a collection of published articles on advocating for your pet's health. Speaking for Spot and Your Dog's Best Health are available at, Amazon.com, local bookstores, and your favorite online book seller.

Total Eclipse of the Sun

Posted on August 21, 2017 at 8:20 AM Comments comments (0)
  As you know, today is the day we are to experience a total eclipse of the sun. Here is some important advice for pet owners from Pet Sitters International.
Best advice for pet owners and pet sitters during the eclipse
   "While damage to pets’ eyes are unlikely, pet parents, as well as professional pet sitters and dog walkers, should consider not bringing pets outdoors for walks or play during the eclipse. Keep pets indoors with windows closed and shades or curtains drawn.
Pet sitters and dog walkers may consider adjusting their schedules to offer their walks at least thirty minutes before or after the eclipse, or recommend that walks for the day be replaced with indoor play instead.
This way the pet is not exposed to large crowds that may gather to view the eclipse and will not be startled by the excitement that may be displayed by the sun gazers.  
If pets will be outdoors, take extra precautions and ensure that all pets have proper identification tags should they be spooked and flee."

4th of July tips to keep pets safe

Posted on June 26, 2017 at 8:19 AM Comments comments (0)
Here are some very important tips to keep your pets safe over the 4th of July holiday from Pet Sitters International

  "1. Keep pets inside during celebrations. While many humans love fireworks, they can be terrifying for pets, and a neighborhood that is normally quiet but becomes busy and loud on the Fourth of July can also cause undue stress—even to pets who are normally outside. When fireworks are likely to go off in your neighborhood or nearby, be sure to keep your pet inside in a safe space. Close all doors and windows, and turn on the television or play calming music.

2. Make sure your pet wears an identification tag. Even if you plan to keep your pet inside over the Fourth of July holiday, it’s a good idea to make sure your pet is wearing a tag with your name and contact information—or the contact information for a professional pet sitter who will be watching the pet. If your pet somehow escapes the property in a moment of panic over loud noises from fireworks or other celebrations, an ID could be vital to ensuring your pet gets back to you. You may also want to consider microchipping your pet.

3. Watch out for unsafe foods and decorations. If you are planning a holiday gathering or party, be sure to keep your pet away from the grill, as well as alcohol and any unsafe foods. While you may be aware of substances that are bad for your pets—for example, chocolate, xylitol, macadamia nuts, grapes, raisins, onions, avocado and bread dough—other guests may not be.
You should also take special care to keep your pet away from décor that could cause harm if chewed on or ingested, as well as any used or unused fireworks, which may look tasty to pets due to their shiny or colorful wrappers. Keep festive items like sparklers and glow sticks away from animals.

4. Don’t just hire a pet lover to watch your pet. If your Fourth of July plans will keep you away from home, your pet could benefit from the services of a professional pet sitter. Your pet will be happier at home, away from crowds, fireworks and loud noises. PSI advises pet owners to only use the services of professional pet sitters.
“Just because someone is a pet lover and has a profile on an online directory—or even on a nationally-publicized site—doesn’t ensure he or she is a qualified pet sitter operating a legitimate business,” said PSI Vice-President Beth Stultz. “In today’s sharing economy anyone can offer their services online, so it’s important for pet owners to take a closer look to ensure they are hiring not just a pet lover, but a pet lover who is also a true pet-care professional.”

Plastic Liners in Litter Boxes

Posted on June 19, 2017 at 8:22 AM Comments comments (0)
      For the life of me I cannot figure out why people insist on putting plastic liners in their cats litter box. It makes absolutely no sense whatsoever for several reasons:
1) Plastic is an unnatural substance for cats to eliminate on.
2) Cats have claws and like to cover up their waste. When they do so, they inevitably rip the plastic liner.
3) When the liner gets ripped, it makes a terrible mess to have to change it.
4) Since the liner does get ripped, the actual bottom of the litter box gets waste and litter on it and has to be cleaned anyway.
5) Cats do not like the feeling of the plastic and often rip it intentionally.
6) The liners never fit properly and become folded trapping excess urine and feces and making it much harder to clean out on a daily basis.
7) It becomes much more costly than just putting the litter directly in the litter box because once the plastic liner is ripped you can't just lift it out and put it in the trash,. You need to use another plastic bag to transfer the liner into so you don't have litter all over the floor as you take it to the trash.

As a professional pet sitter who has cared for hundreds of cats over the years and cleaned hundreds of litter boxes, I can tell you the plastic liners are just a bad idea all the way around.

Misleading Pet Food Websites

Posted on May 31, 2017 at 6:04 PM Comments comments (0)
There is absolutely no doubt that the huge multi-billion dollar pet food industry is so interested in the bottom line - profits- that they will deliberately mislead or even lie to consumers to make a buck. Here is just another example from Susan Thaxton's website - "The Truth About Pet Food."

"Not true Hill’s Science Diet
There is no excuse. No pet food company should make misleading or false statements to consumers on their website. Some examples of false statements from Hill’s Pet Foods." Check this out.


Companion Animal Nutrition and Wellness Institute

Posted on May 25, 2017 at 8:38 AM Comments comments (0)
CANWI

Dr. Karen Becker, a holistic veterinarian, and the contributor of Healthy Pets on Mercola.com AND Dr. Donna Raditic, a Board Certified Veterinary Nutritionist, have teamed up to form an organization called Companion Animal Nutrition and Wellness Institute. Both veterinarians agree the foundation of the health of our companion animals is optimum nutrition. They also agree that there is insufficient independent research being done to compare the benefits of feeding dry food versus canned food versus raw or a fresh food diet.
In traditional veterinary training, there is very little information in the curriculum about nutrition and how to feed pets the best food possible to provide them with a long life free of disease.  All of the research done to date on pet nutrition, is funded by the large pet food companies that obviously have a vested business interest in the research. They do care about our pets but care more about the bottom line first. After all, they are in business.

Dr. Becker and Dr. Raditic started CANWI to create a research organization that receives no funding at all from government or pet food companies. The research will be funded entirely by pet parents whose only interest is in finding out how to feed their pets the best nutrition possible.

"Millions of pets have experienced the life-changing benefits of a fresh food diet, but critics say the benefits of fresh foods have not been researched. Until now. This will be the FIRST independent, unbiased pet food study comparing dry, canned and fresh food. Please help us fund this critical research project! This week, when you make a Donation to CANWI, Mercola.com will match funds to help get this critical research started."
I hope you agree that this type of research is essential to taking the best care of your Fido or Fluffy. Please donate today.

Click below to help enrich the lives of our furry friends!

Handling Open food for Pets

Posted on April 20, 2017 at 8:33 AM Comments comments (0)
I came across some very important information in a newsletter from Care2 Healthy Living this am regarding the handling of pet food. I want to share it with you and advise you to follow their suggestions.

"How long to leave out canned or moist food is a common question from pet owners. Dogs and cats don’t always eat the entire can, and food safety is always questionable when food is left out. Burkholder and Conway weigh in, “The length of time that food can be left out safely depends on a number of variables. Uneaten or open canned/moist food should be covered and refrigerated as soon as possible. As a general rule of thumb, do not leave open canned/moist food sitting unrefrigerated (e.g., in your pet’s bowl or on the counter at room temperature) for more than two hours. This is when bacteria in food can multiply rapidly and lead to foodborne illness.”
Dry food and dishes should be handled similarly to canned food. The FDA recommends storing dry pet food in its original bag inside a clean, dedicated plastic container with a lid, keeping the top of the bag folded closed. Ideal storage conditions are a cool, dry place — under 80 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s also a good idea to wash your hands after handling dry food and use a scoop that is dedicated just for pet food. The FDA also recommends keeping pets away from food storage and preparation areas, garbage and household trash."

Professional Pet Sitters Celebration Week

Posted on March 7, 2017 at 10:43 AM Comments comments (0)


"March 5-11 marks the 23rd annual celebration of Professional Pet Sitters Week™ (PPSW™). Introduced by Pet Sitters International in 1995, PPSW is an annual observance that honors professional pet-care providers, seeks to educate the pet-owning public about the advantages of professional in-home pet care and encourages pet-loving entrepreneurs to explore professional pet sitting as a viable career.".

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